Workforce Study: Most Cyber Workers Started Their Careers Elsewhere

Unlike doctors or engineers, most cybersecurity professionals didn’t set out to work in their chosen field. In fact, more than half started their careers elsewhere and eventually made the move to cybersecurity. But once they make the move, most decide to stay. Nearly two thirds of cybersecurity professionals (65%) intend to stay in the field until they retire, thanks to high demand for their skills and the challenging nature of the work, according to the (ISC)2 Cybersecurity Workforce Study, 2019. The desire to stay indicates most are finding fulfillment in the field, even if working in cybersecurity wasn’t their original…

(ISC)2 Leaders Honored by SC Magazine as Europe’s Most Influential Women in Cybersecurity

Gender diversity in the cybersecurity industry is a key issue as we seek to create a larger, more representative, balanced and welcoming industry for all. As the (ISC)2 2019 Cybersecurity Workforce Study revealed, a global shortage of more than four million trained cybersecurity professionals exists, and women represent just 30% of the current workforce, meaning recruitment and advancement of women is a strategic imperative to limiting, if not closing, the gap. A separate report by (ISC)2 published earlier this year highlighted the surge of women into senior roles, but confirmed that there remains much more work to do to both…

Some Cyber Roles are Overstaffed While Others Are Understaffed

As organizations struggle to staff their cybersecurity teams, new (ISC)2 research reveals they also may be suffering from an imbalance in the distribution of team member roles. Positions that currently appear overstaffed include compliance, forensics and operational technology security while jobs in security operations, security administration and risk management seem to be understaffed. This creates a need for CISOs and cybersecurity managers to take a close look at their teams and figure out what adjustments to make. Keeping too many people in certain roles while understaffing other positions potentially makes it harder for an organization to build and maintain effective…

Strategies for Building a Cybersecurity Dream Team

As organizations struggle to fill cybersecurity vacancies due to a worldwide shortage of 4 million professionals, they should consider implementing strategies to attract qualified candidates and prevent experienced staff from leaving. The (ISC)2 Cybersecurity Workforce Study 2019 lays out four strategies organizations should consider: Address cybersecurity team members’ needs with training and career development opportunities. Properly set internal expectations about applicant qualifications to widen the search for candidates as much as possible. Target recent college graduates and workers with degrees relevant to cybersecurity. Grow your cybersecurity team from within with further development and cross-training opportunities. All of these strategies are…

(ISC)² Chapter Program Recognizes Outstanding Chapters

The (ISC)² Chapter Recognition Awards are presented to official regional chapters of (ISC)² that best promote the vision of (ISC)² by inspiring a safe and secure cyber world. The chapters demonstrate a well-rounded offering of activities and services designed to benefit members and affiliates, while making a significant contribution to the profession and their local community through the core focus areas of the (ISC)² Chapter Program of Connect, Educate, Inspire and Secure. (ISC)² chapters self-nominated by completing a questionnaire on their accomplishments. Members of the newly formed Chapter Advisory Committee reviewed and scored the entries, and the top-rated chapter in…

Help Wanted: Cybersecurity Workers

On November 1, 2019 CNBC’s Nightly Business Report featured the growing need for qualified cybersecurity workers in their “Help Wanted” segment. The (ISC)2 Cybersecurity Workforce Study, 2019 served as the foundation of this story, which pointed to the newly reported shortage of 4 million trained cybersecurity professionals worldwide. Cybersecurity analyst Mandi Ingersoll of TDI Security, a cybersecurity firm in Washington, D.C., began her career in cybersecurity in the U.S. Navy. She chose to stay in the field after retiring from military service. “It’s interesting because it’s always something new.” TDI’s CEO, Paul Innella, CISSP-ISSMP says the firm has had trouble…

(ISC)² Estimates Cybersecurity Workforce at 2.8 million

The cybersecurity industry in the United States and 10 other major global economies currently employs 2.8 million professionals. But the industry continues to struggle with a significant workforce shortage, and it would take another 4 million professionals to close the gap. That would mean an increase of 145% cybersecurity workers, according to the findings of the (ISC)² Cybersecurity Workforce Study 2019. The study, released this week, represents the first estimate of how many people are employed in cybersecurity. Countries covered by the study are the U.S., U.K., Canada, Germany, France, Australia, Singapore, Brazil, Mexico, Japan and South Korea. According to…

Security Congress Final Thoughts: Being There for Others (Part 2)

Human Spirit Admiral William H. McRaven (retired) was one of the speakers at (ISC)2 Security Congress who received a standing ovation. Another was Eric Wahl, an artist and best-selling author, who delivered the lunch hour keynote on the second day. He mesmerized the audience by painting portraits of Michael Jordan, John Lennon and Albert Einstein to heart-pounding music in a matter of minutes. He urged attendees to let the human spirit drive them even as they increasingly rely on digital tools, data, analytics and automation to do their job of protecting people and organizations. Wahl talked about the importance of…

Security Congress Final Thoughts: Being There for Others (Part 1)

Sometimes you need a boatload of people to help you through. It’s a lesson Admiral William H. McRaven (retired) learned after a parachute accident that left him bedridden for months. The accident happened while he was participating in a Naval Special Warfare exercise involving a 1,000-foot free-fall jump. McRaven, who served as the ninth commander of the U.S. Special Operations command from August 2011 to August 2014, got both legs tangled in his parachute because another parachutist was underneath him and opened his chute into McRaven’s falling body. When McRaven opened his own chute, his legs became tangled and the…

Security Congress: Securing a Rapidly Changing Environment

The cyber ecosystem is changing faster than ever, creating new attack surfaces and increasing the challenge of defending against new and evolving threats. The fast-changing landscape requires new ways of thinking and approaches to protect environments that spread across on-premise and cloud infrastructures and connect IT with OT (operational technology) systems. Just accepting that the expansion of the ecosystem – and the growing presence of technology in our lives – will increase risk isn’t good enough. This is a point (ISC)2 CEO David Shearer made clear at the kickoff of the organization’s Security Congress 2019 this week in Orlando. We…