Cybersecurity Certifications

No Limits, No Excuses: Commit to Certification in 2020

Why are goal-oriented individuals more likely to thrive professionally? Because they know where they want to go. But accomplishing anything meaningful takes drive and dedication. Most of all, it requires a clearly defined plan and inspiration to stay on track. A milestone like achieving (ISC)2 certification is a powerful motivator, especially when you consider the rewards that come with it. Was 2019 the year you wanted to earn an (ISC)2 credential to enter a high-demand field, enhance your cybersecurity skills or increase job security? Perhaps you even started preparing, but got sidetracked by life’s demands. We really do get it……

Wanted: Cloud Security Skills

As demand for cloud computing grows, so does the need to secure it. In a survey of its Technology Executive Council members, CNBC found that cloud and software-defined security are among the C-suite’s top technology strategies for 2020. As reported in this video, cloud computing tops the list, and it’s followed by machine learning, artificial intelligence and software-defined security. The CNBC Technology Executive Council has nearly 150 executives in various industries, 70% of whom participated in the survey. The survey shows that securing cloud environments is a major priority – not only for the C-suite but also for cybersecurity workers….

Most Employers Don’t Pay Full Cost of Certifications

One of the most common complaints cybersecurity professionals voice about their employers is that they have to pay for certifications out of their own pockets. It’s not a trivial issue, since workers consider certifications their number one career hurdle, according the (ISC)2 Cybersecurity Workforce Study 2019. Based on study findings, most employers don’t pay their cybersecurity workers’ certification fees. Considerably fewer than half of respondents in the study (37%) say their employers pay for them while 21% say they share the cost with employers. More than one third of respondents (35%) pay for all of their own cybersecurity certification costs….

So You Have Decided to Become Cyber Security Certified, Now What?

By Tony Vizza, CISSP, CCSP, Director for Cyber Security Advocacy – APAC at (ISC)² Toward the end of 2019, I met many aspiring women and men who approached me and said, “Tony, I want to become cyber security certified, how do I do it?” If you are reading this article, it is likely that you have made a conscious decision to do so. Congratulations on taking this step in furthering your career, skills and knowledge. You have made the decision to demonstrate to the wider world your hard-gained experience, knowledge and skills in cybersecurity and to prove to yourself that…

How To Navigate An Uncertain Job Horizon

As published in the September/October edition of InfoSecurity Professional Magazine By Deborah Johnson Advice on how to mitigate a sudden job loss due to redundancy, recession or ‘rightsizing’. Diana Contesti was a business continuity planner at a major steel manufacturer in Hamilton, Ontario, when a recession hit the Canadian steel industry in the early 1990s. The economic contraction forced companies to cut jobs. Her employer called it “rightsizing” when leadership announced it would cut approximately 3,000 positions. The layoffs were based on seniority by department, and based on that criterion, Contesti knew she was out. “I was extremely worried. I’m…

SSCPs: We Need Your Input

(ISC)² regularly conducts Job Task Analysis (JTA) studies to review and update the content outline (or exam blueprint) of its credentialing examinations. A JTA is the methodical process used to determine tasks that are performed by credential holders and knowledge and skills required to perform those tasks successfully. Results of the JTA study link a candidate’s examination score directly to the domain knowledge being tested. The existing exam blueprint for SSCP will be reviewed in early 2020. In preparation for the upcoming review, we would like to hear from our SSCP members regarding new and emerging IT cyber security issues…

Job Satisfaction Is High Among Cybersecurity Workers

Cybersecurity professionals face plenty of challenges in their work – there’s always something new to learn, cyber attackers are relentless and security teams are usually short-staffed. Still, nearly two-thirds of cybersecurity professionals (66%) say they are satisfied with their jobs. But that number jumps to 72% among cybersecurity workers whose employers pay for their certifications, according to the 2019 (ISC)2 Cybersecurity Workforce Study. For professionals whose organizations pay for only part or none of their certification costs, the number drops to 63%. This is an important finding for employers who are trying to build their cybersecurity teams. Currently there is…

Cyber Threats to Healthcare on the Rise

Hospitals are set up to fight infections, but not necessarily the kind that has been plaguing healthcare institutions lately – malware. A new report estimates that cyber threats against healthcare targets increased 60% since January, surpassing the total number of threats identified in all of 2018. The most common threat targeting the healthcare industry is Trojan malware, which increased 82% in the third quarter from Q2, according to the report by Malwarebytes, Cybercrime Tactics and Techniques: The 2019 State of Healthcare. Most of the Trojan attacks involved Emotet and TrickBot, which are the two most dangerous Trojans around since 2018….

Workforce Study: Most Cyber Workers Started Their Careers Elsewhere

Unlike doctors or engineers, most cybersecurity professionals didn’t set out to work in their chosen field. In fact, more than half started their careers elsewhere and eventually made the move to cybersecurity. But once they make the move, most decide to stay. Nearly two thirds of cybersecurity professionals (65%) intend to stay in the field until they retire, thanks to high demand for their skills and the challenging nature of the work, according to the (ISC)2 Cybersecurity Workforce Study, 2019. The desire to stay indicates most are finding fulfillment in the field, even if working in cybersecurity wasn’t their original…

Some Cyber Roles are Overstaffed While Others Are Understaffed

As organizations struggle to staff their cybersecurity teams, new (ISC)2 research reveals they also may be suffering from an imbalance in the distribution of team member roles. Positions that currently appear overstaffed include compliance, forensics and operational technology security while jobs in security operations, security administration and risk management seem to be understaffed. This creates a need for CISOs and cybersecurity managers to take a close look at their teams and figure out what adjustments to make. Keeping too many people in certain roles while understaffing other positions potentially makes it harder for an organization to build and maintain effective…